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Millions Recovered

  • $5,400,000.00 settlement involving a seaman who fell from a stairway during fire and boat drill aboard a container ship sustaining quadriplegic injuries. Partners Mellusi and Shisha personally inspected the vessel taking hundreds of measurements and still and videos of every stairway in the ship’s main deck house. The data was compared with the vessel’s design plans in our library which demonstrated the vessel had been negligently constructed in that it failed to follow the naval architect’s original design specifications.
  • $2,400,000 jury award to a licensed marine engineer who sustained permanent knee injuries while attempting to remove a 200 lb. valve from an overhead piping system. Partner Mellusi personally inspected the ship’s engine room taking detailed photos and measurements. A duplicate valve was obtained from a maritime junkyard and was brought into court along with an auto-shop mechanical hoist capable of lifting it 12 feet to demonstrate the vessel lacked suitable means to perform this work safely. The jury award was in top ten verdicts in the United States for a comparable knee injury. The case was tried to verdict in a New York Federal Court.
  • $2,980,000.00 jury award to a ship’s cook for back injury resulting from insufficient procedures for moving ship stores. Case tried in New York federal court.
  • $2,700,000.00 settlement to a mate on a Tanker vessel who sustained multiple fractures.
  • $2,000,000.00 was awarded to a barge deckhand – wrongful death.
  • $1,827,000 awarded to a marine engineer working on a US Government supply vessel who fell into an unguarded ventilation fan causing neck, shoulder and hand injuries. The case was tried non-jury before a federal judge in Baltimore Federal Court. The court award was subsequently determined to be within the highest ten verdicts for the State of Maryland in 2009.
  • $1,200,000.00 jury award to a ship’s Bosun who sustained shoulder and neck injuries while attempting to move plywood sheets on main deck of vessel during 40 knot winds. Case tried in New York Federal Court.
  • $950,000 awarded to passenger killed when his recreational boat came into collision with tow wire of tug and barge
  • $850,000 settlement, Federal Court Allentown PA., to seaman sustained herniated disk while lifting a 110 lbs crane hooks.
  • $840,000 jury award to a seaman who fell from ladder while painting sustaining fractured wrist.
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Wrongful Death Archives

Oil tanker safety tips

Oil tankers bring valuable resources to New York but working on them is not without some form of hazard. At Tabak Mellusi & Shisha LLP, we know that the wrong action can result in the death of a loved one or in severe injuries. If you work on an oil tanker, you should be aware that there are several ways you can protect yourself from unnecessary harm during a cargo operation.

Tugboats: Iconic but risky work environments

If you look through a collection of old and new pictures of life on the water around New York City, you cannot fail to notice the tugboats. These small but tough little vessels are responsible for towing larger ships out to sea and into port, but they can also be a risky place to work, leading to serious injury and even death. Our staff here at Tabak Mellusi & Shisha LLP know only too well the heartache that these boats can leave in their wake when someone is killed while trying to do their job.

Commercial fishing: How can I protect myself if the vessel sinks?

Commercial fishing is a large industry and presents a number of opportunities for people in New York. However, you should be aware of the risks associated with this type of occupation and one of the risks is that the vessel will sink. If it does, are there ways that you can protect yourself from drowning?

What is the Death on the High Seas Act?

At Tabak Mellusi & Shisha LLP, we know that ship environments can be dangerous even in the best weather conditions. If you have lost a loved one as the result of an accident on a ship, then you may be able to file a civil lawsuit against the responsible party under the Death on the High Seas Act. According to Cornell University Law School’s Public Information Institute, the act is in effect if the fatal accident happened at sea and the distance from the accident to a U.S. shore was more than three nautical miles.

After fatal accident, families of 3 tugboat crew members search for answers

With so many unknown and constantly changing variables, on a daily basis; the men and women who work aboard boats and sea vessels of all sizes put their health, safety and very lives at risk. Residents in the New York City area were recently reminded of just how dangerous this line of work can be after an accident on the Hudson River claimed the lives of three tugboat crew members.

How misidentifying unsafe ship parts can turn deadly for crew

As you may or may not know, ship owners are required by law to maintain their vessels to ensure the safety of their crew. This includes everything from ensuring safe working conditions to repairing any unsafe equipment or mechanical parts on the ship. Failing to do so, as you can imagine, can have dire consequences for a ship owner and his or her crew.

Do you need to worry about a terrorist attack at sea?

The recent string of terrorist attacks are not just concerning to people here in the United States, they're alarming to the rest of the world as well. Knowing that an attack can happen anywhere and at anytime is very disconcerting, especially because they oftentimes end in injury or even death.

Hundreds of ship passengers feared dead after ship capsizes in Yangtze River

The search and rescue mission to save passengers from the capsized Chinese ship the Oriental Star, has now largely turned into a recovery operation as hopes of finding survivors dim. At the time the river boat capsized, it was traveling on China's massive Yangtze River near the country's Three Gorges Dam with a total of 456 people onboard.

What is the Jones Act and to whom do its provisions apply?

Anyone who works aboard a sea vessel faces certain inherent risks and dangers. Seamen are often forced to perform work-related duties while battling inclement weather and rough sea conditions. Even in calm conditions; equipment may malfunction, slippery conditions onboard a vessel may result in an individual suffering injuries related to a slip and fall or the negligent actions of a co-worker may put an individual's physical health and wellbeing in jeopardy.

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Rated By Superlawyer Ralph J Mellusi Rated By Superlawyer Ralph J Mellusi
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