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Millions Recovered

  • $5,400,000.00 settlement involving a seaman who fell from a stairway during fire and boat drill aboard a container ship sustaining quadriplegic injuries. Partners Mellusi and Shisha personally inspected the vessel taking hundreds of measurements and still and videos of every stairway in the ship’s main deck house. The data was compared with the vessel’s design plans in our library which demonstrated the vessel had been negligently constructed in that it failed to follow the naval architect’s original design specifications.
  • $4,400,000.00 jury award to a former shipmate who sustained a shoulder injury while at sea. The third mate had to undergo multiple surgeries and will not be able to become a captain because of the injury.
  • $2,400,000 jury award to a licensed marine engineer who sustained permanent knee injuries while attempting to remove a 200 lb. valve from an overhead piping system. Partner Mellusi personally inspected the ship’s engine room taking detailed photos and measurements. A duplicate valve was obtained from a maritime junkyard and was brought into court along with an auto-shop mechanical hoist capable of lifting it 12 feet to demonstrate the vessel lacked suitable means to perform this work safely. The jury award was in top ten verdicts in the United States for a comparable knee injury. The case was tried to verdict in a New York Federal Court.
  • $2,980,000.00 jury award to a ship’s cook for back injury resulting from insufficient procedures for moving ship stores. Case tried in New York federal court.
  • $2,700,000.00 settlement to a mate on a Tanker vessel who sustained multiple fractures.
  • $2,000,000.00 was awarded to a barge deckhand – wrongful death.
  • $1,827,000 awarded to a marine engineer working on a US Government supply vessel who fell into an unguarded ventilation fan causing neck, shoulder and hand injuries. The case was tried non-jury before a federal judge in Baltimore Federal Court. The court award was subsequently determined to be within the highest ten verdicts for the State of Maryland in 2009.
  • $1,200,000.00 jury award to a ship’s Bosun who sustained shoulder and neck injuries while attempting to move plywood sheets on main deck of vessel during 40 knot winds. Case tried in New York Federal Court.
  • $950,000 awarded to passenger killed when his recreational boat came into collision with tow wire of tug and barge
  • $850,000 settlement, Federal Court Allentown PA., to seaman sustained herniated disk while lifting a 110 lbs crane hooks.
  • $840,000 jury award to a seaman who fell from ladder while painting sustaining fractured wrist.
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Personal Injury Archives

The not so glamorous life of working on a cruise ship

People imagine that working on a cruise ship is filled with fun, entertainment and exhilarating world travel. When job-seekers sign contracts to work on these vessels they are suddenly thrown into a much harsher reality. Many cruise ships push their crewmembers to the limit with hard labor and long hours. Some employees are brought to the point of exhaustion and injury.

Three companies sued over seaman's amputated foot

There is no question that working on a ship is dangerous. Ropes that contain thousands of pounds of pressure, heavy equipment that needs to be moved, slippery decks, narrow stairwells and deep tanks all pose risks of injury to those who work aboard. While some injuries received on a ship may be slight, like a sprained wrist or a bruised shoulder, others can leave men and women in New York unable to return to work and therefore support themselves and their families.

What are the symptoms of frostbite?

Working on a fishing boat is not easy. You have to continuously deal with heavy equipment, rough seas, slippery decks and bad weather. While other New Yorkers often spend their winter days in warm buildings, you must brave the cold while hauling in crab, lobster, black sea bass or other marine delicacies. You also have to be on the watch for symptoms of frostbite.

Identifying the signs of lead poisoning

Working around a ship can expose people to a number of toxins and one of these is lead. In a previous post, it was discussed how New Yorkers working in a shipyard could be inhaling lead particles while performing routine maintenance. Therefore, it is important for workers around ships to learn how to identify the signs that they may be suffering from lead poisoning.

Pool accident leaves child on cruise ship in serious condition

Taking a cruise is viewed by many New Yorkers as the ideal way to escape their everyday stresses and the industry is booming. As cruise ships grow in size with more cabins, waterslides, rock walls, dance clubs, restaurants and other features, the risk of passenger injuries also seems to increase. Statistic Brain states that since 1979, 172 passengers have died on these floating hotels and 55 ships have sunk. Additionally, thousands of people have suffered some type of injury while on board.

Royal Caribbean facing first lawsuits after storm disaster

Several weeks ago we wrote a blog post about the Royal Caribbean cruise ship the Anthem of the Seas which, as you may know from news reports, was caught in a storm last month that caused damage to the ship. Although reports at the time indicated that no one had received injuries on the ship, reports now are telling a different story.

Huge storms vs huge ships: Are cruise passengers in danger?

You may have read the news reports or even seen the videos, but what happened last week aboard a Royal Caribbean cruise ship is difficult to imagine unless you were there. For hundreds of passengers aboard the cruise line's Anthem of the Seas, their vacations were turned on their heads, literally, when the ship sailed into stormy seas just days into its journey.

The Maritime Labour Convention: Ensuring medical care at sea

As our more frequent readers are well aware, not all seafaring vessels have the ability to stop at a port or request medical assistance from a doctor on land at the drop of a hat. Many vessels are out at sea for days, weeks or even months at a time. But as you know, medical emergencies can happen at anytime, meaning ship operators need to be prepared for these worst case scenarios.

How will Congress' crude oil decision affect ship workers?

Even if you don't follow the markets, you've probably guessed that crude oil prices are still dropping as has been evident by looking at the price per gallon of gas at gas stations all over New York. But even bigger news still is the fact that Congress may soon end a "40-year-old ban on crude oil exports," explains CNBC.

Why you should consider the freeboard of a vessel before sailing

If you're unfamiliar with maritime terminology, as many across the nation are, then you've probably never heard of the term freeboard. Because you've never heard of it, you've also probably never considered how important it is when determining the safety of a vessel on certain waterways. In today's post, we'd like to explain what freeboard is to illustrate why you should consider it before operating a vessel.

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