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July 2017 Archives

Are you in danger of toxic exposure on a container ship?

As a seaman who crosses international waters on a cargo vessel, you may leave port in New York or elsewhere in the U.S. with goods that require fumigation or other treatments with hazardous gases. According to the National Institutes of Health, many of the toxic substances that are used on these ships have caused injuries and death for crew members.

Sailing lesson turns deadly for boy in Long Island

New York City and many of its suburbs are surrounded by water and therefore, boating is a popular recreational activity. However, activities involving boats can also be dangerous and a day of fun and sun can quickly take a dangerous turn, especially for those who are inexperienced. Suffering an injury on the water can be extremely serious for victims and their families.

Negligence not relevant for maintenance and cure

When a New York seaman is injured on a vessel, the owner is required to pay for medical bills, lodging, transportation and food until the seaman either returns to work or improves as much as he or she can under medical care. According to the U.S. Courts for the Ninth Circuit, these expenses are known as maintenance and cure and are rights that seamen have as long as they can fulfill the burden of proof.

Should the Jones Act be repealed?

If you work in the shipping industry in New York, you have likely heard of the Jones Act. You may even have strong feelings about it. You wouldn't be alone. Many people have boisterous opinions about this law from the 1920s. Most of them feel it is time to retire it completely and allow for better, less restrictive regulations to take its place.

Recreational boat deaths on the rise across U.S.

With recreational boating season in full swing across the country, the Coast Guard and local officials are encouraging boaters to wear life jackets and avoid drinking while operating their boats. There's data behind these warnings: according to a recent Coast Guard report, alcohol was the most common known factor in recreational boating deaths last year, and the vast majority of drowning victims of boating accidents were not wearing life jackets.

Boating and alcohol: a bad combination

Because boating is typically seen as a recreational activity, New Yorkers may assume that the laws concerning alcohol behind the wheel of a boat are not as stringent as those restricting car drivers. According to the U.S. Coast Guard, though, boating under the influence can be just as deadly as driving while impaired. About 16 percent of all boating deaths are alcohol-related.

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